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Case History

We’ve been in business for 45 years which means we have seen it all. During that time, we have aligned almost every application, and as a result, have the widest laser alignment product offering in the marketplace today. Below you will find a very small sample of some of the stories our customers have told us over the years. The list may be small but the number of customers who have successfully profited from using our lasers is too numerous to publish. But for those who are curious, here is a list of our largest customers: Boeing, McDonald Douglas, and General Motors to name a few.


Click here for an abbreviated list of our major customers

 

vertical hydro shaft alignment laser AUTOMOTIVE
L-700 Spindle Laser Saves One GM Plant $1 Million Annually

GM Study Shows 50% Improvement in Quality and Costs

GM Study Shows 50% Improvement in Quality and Costs
Spindle Alignment Report

 

Source: Internal GM/UAW Tooling Life Study.

Attached are some graphs, photos and or comparisons of tool life and overall quality of parts that are machined for V-8 and V-6 engines in the main plant, both before laser alignment and after. The attached information is also only an example of 2% of what we have accomplished since we have begun with laser alignment.

In our opinion the overall advantage of laser alignment as far as "Dollar Sign" and "Quality" significance, we can see at least an average of 50% improvement; some are more, some are less.

We believe that this company MUST continue with laser alignment to stay competitive and produce a quality part far beyond most other competitors. As far as it stands at the present, Plant 1 is the only plant that is successful with this new technology and the word if spreading rapidly.

After Laser Alignment

    • OP[eration] 80 Semi, all standard size cutters
  • OP[eration] 80 Finish, 30% plus increase in tool life
  • 4 Area fixture repair men with "hands on" experience
  • Increased knowledge of and confidence in new techniques for solutions of old problems
  • Elimination of tool change of 20 minutes per day
  • Increase of 20 blocks per day


GM Study Shows 11,000% Improvement in Tooling Life
GM Study Shows 11,000% Improvement in Tooling Life

GM Study Shows 11,000% Improvement in Tooling Life
Laser Alignment Group, Delta Engine Plant

Source: Internal GM/UAW Tooling Life Study.

Subject: Rough blocks, operation 180, Station 10 Left Hand

Tap usage on station 10 left hand was about one tap per every fifty blocks. In two shifts we figure tooling cost was about $100.00 a day. [Ed. Note: Keep in mind that the entire block line has to be stopped to change a tool.] The 10mm taps cost $9.00 a piece.

On May 10, 1990 the laser group went in with the Hamar 800 Spindle Alignment Laser. The job was started at 7:30 a.m. Machine repair had to make some moves on the head to bring it in alignment to the part. The head and part were at an angle to each other and off center. The operation was back together and running by 11:02 a.m. the same day.

This was a very successful lineup job. This problem has been ongoing since the operation was installed. One week later the operation was checked for tool usage and it was found that 6,000 blocks were run without any tool breakage. It appears that in a three hour proper alignment the tool savings will be between $15,000 to $25,000 a year plus downtime [Ed. Note: The previous study showed and increase of 20 engine blocks a day, which totaled close to $1 million].

Delta Engine Plant

Laser Alignment Technical Support

Contents:

  1. Tap Cost Savings Cylinder blocks operation 170 Stations 7 thru 25
  2. Cost Saving Formula
  3. Part Graphs

Cost Savings Laser Alignment Tooling Study Rough Cylinder Block

Formula For Cost Savings

    1. Operation #170 Blocks
  • Based on 90 Blocks per hour average
  • 40 hours a week per shift
  • 2 shifts a week production
  • 7200 parts total production per week
  • Based on 50 weeks a year

Tap Cost

6 MM X 1.0 $ 7.79 8 MM X 1.25 $ 8.49 9 MM X 1.25 $14.47 10 MM X 1.50 $ 9.62 11 MM X 1.50 $14.21 12 MM X 1.75 $15.33 18 MM X 1.50 $25.51
Pipe Tap (Straight) 1/4 - 18 $9.94 Pipe Tap (Straight) 1/8 - 27 $7.19 Pipe Tap (Straight) 3/8 - 18 $9.94
Too Cost Savings Formula Example
Operation 170 Station 25 LH
8 MM Tap 7200/2200 = 3.27 Taps per week, Before
7200/5000 = 1.44 Taps per week, After
3.27 - 1.44 = 1.83 Tool Change Savings a week
$8.49 X 1.83 = $15.53 A Tap per week
$15.53 X 4 Taps in head = $62.14 per week
$62.14 X 50 weeks = $3,107.34 per year
6 MM Tap 7200/2000 = 3.6 Taps per week, Before
7200/5000 = 1.44 Taps per week, After
3.6 - 1.44 = 2.16 Tool Change Savings a week
$7.79 X 2.16 = $16.82 A Tap per week
$16.82 X 50 = $841.32 a year
$3,107.34 + $841.32 = $3,948.66 Total Savings per year
Total Savings on head for five Taps $3,948.66

MACHINE TOOLS
Machine Scraping Uses Laser Technology to Improve Accuracy

Machine Scraping Uses Laser Technology to Improve Accuracy

Machine Scraping Uses Laser Technology to Improve Accuracy
Combining New Technology with Old Art Form for Improved Accuracy

Source: Powertrain Connection - A UAW Plant Newsletter, Nov., 1989

Old methods and new technology are being combined at Plant #3¹s Rebuild Area in such a way that greater accuracy, more dependability, and a faster rebuild time is realized from the machinery taken there.

Randy Bruce, Fixture Repairman, and Bob Jones, Machine Repair, are reviving the old method of "scraping" (which has not been a part of the educational training for new Tradesmen for some time now) and combining it with the technology of surface and spindle lasers to come up with a system that brings machine tolerances within limits that are more than just acceptable. "In the past," explains Bob Jones "if a machine was set up and its tolerances were within the outside parameters, and it was set level, the machine would be run and everyone was happy. But tool-life would be reduced because not all planes were looked at to find that level. Today, with the lasers, we can not only find out if a machine is level, we can check every surface for inclinations, parallels, perpendiculars, etc. Our accuracy is within tens of thousandths. This improves the accuracy of machining and increases the life of tools."

"The art of scraping," says Bob Jones "is one that has been passed on by some of the old-time Journeymen to Apprentices or EITs that have worked with them. It is not a skill that is taught in the classroom. Grinding seems to be the preferred method for many, but scraping is more precise and when used in conjunction with lasers, it gives a much better fit for parts. These methods are not being used in the industry today."

Bob Jones and Bruce are currently rebuilding a Precision Surface Grinder from Building 40¹s Tool Room. The machine will be rebuilt (on balance time) from the ground up taking special care to ensure that the surface of each part fits perfectly with other surfaces. Bob Jones says that by using laser technology, there will be approximately a 40% time savings over other methods that require constant leveling and releveling to double check accuracy.

Bruce adds, "Because of the success we have had, we¹ve gone into the shop of an outside vendor with our lasers and verified the accuracy of their work (when they are doing work for us). Our goal is to prove that we can do the work faster, more accurately, and cheaper by keeping it in-house instead of using outside vendors. I believe that we are doing that."

"In Powertrain, Union and Management are working together to try to reduce subcontracting of work that our employees can do."

George Hall, Maintenance General Supervisor, fully supports the work that Jones and Bruce are doing and agrees with their goal. "In Powertrain, Union and Management are working together to try to reduce subcontracting of work that our employees can do. Jones and Bruce are doing an excellent job and with the help of employees like them, this is one phase of the business that we are proving we can do competitively with improved quality in-house."

"As I've said many times in the past," says J. Hill, Skilled Trades Shop Committeeman, "if our Skilled Tradesmen are provided with the resources and the opportunity, they can make significant contributions in the cost and quality arenas - and this insures their own job security."

L-723 Increases Tool Life on Punch Press
L-723 Increases Tool Life on Punch Press

L-723 Increases Tool Life on Punch Press
by Keith Roszman, HLI Technician

US Manufacturing uses hydraulic presses with a long stroke to do what they call extruding axial housing tubes, a kind of forging type forming operation.

The problems they were having:

    1. The punches were breaking prematurely
  • After the press made the part, misalignment would cause the die stack to bind on the punch, while retracting, until enough reverse pressure caused die to break loose, slamming the slide into the crown and gland assembly.
  • Misalignment caused one corner of the machine would lift off from the floor when tonnage was applied.

The people they normally use for Laser alignment, used our old L-711 system. However, they were out of town and so we were called.

I went in with The L-723 Laser. At first, all they wanted was parallelism checked between the stationary and moving bolster plates. After a little discussion with maintenance and the operator, I checked parallel of the 45-degree ways with the main hydraulic Ram with a tape measure. They were out about 3/8" to 1/2". I then set up the laser roughtly level to Earth and bucked it in to three points on the crown. This seemed to be the only original reference on the machine. After making the 45-degree ways parallel with each other, and square with the crown, I then adjusted the gibbs on the slide so the main hydraulic Ram was parallel with the ways. I then bucked-in to the stationary bolster, checked the face of the slide to be parallel with the bolster and recorded the numbers. This took about 2 hours. We then aligned the press and I gave them their report.

A few weeks later I talked with them and they said it had never run better and were delighted with its performance. The punches were lasting much longer, the press was not lifting off the floor and the felt there was a lot less wear and tear on the machine.


L-723 Enables High-Scrap-Rate Toshiba CNC to be Certified as a Master CNC
L-723 Enables High-Scrap-Rate Toshiba CNC to be Certified as a Master CNC

L-723 Enables High-Scrap Rate Toshiba CNC to be Certified as a Master-Building CNC

by Randy Bruce, HLI Technician, July 30, 1996

We were presented with a problem from a metal forming plant in Canada. The problem existed in the foundations they installed under their mills which are on floating pads. Since all of these machines had a basement under them they needed a way to isolate them from the rest of the vibrations created in the plant. They did this by installing the machine on top of a large cement pad that sits on top of rubber based pads. This allows the whole pad to float while isolating the machine from external vibration.

The problem they encountered was that they had no way of checking the alignment of the machine with levels. As soon as they moved the table on the machine the levels would "bottom out" from the pad floating.

By using the L-723 we were able to set up on the pad and buck-in to the boring mills base ways (x-axis). This machine is a Toshiba boring mill with x, y, and z-axis travel. After shooting in to the base ways we were able to find the flatness of the x-axis ways as well as the parallelism of the table and table travel, and the parallelism of the y-axis ways and the squareness of the column for both lean and tilt, all in one set up. Because we were shot into the base ways and not looking at Earth level the machine pad could move and not affect what we were doing.

The base ways were out of flat to themselves by .020 in 20 feet, the y-axis ways were pitched up in the rear by .015 and the column was out of square by .016 in 10 feet, leaning in toward the table.

We flattened the ways to each other and had to actually realign the column to be perpendicular to the base ways.

Before the machine had been aligned the machine was cutting holes off location on the dies and all of the dies machined by this mill all had to be redone. When the dies were put in the press they did not fit together correctly, creating scrap parts. I found that they had aligned the column with large knee fixture, and I asked if I could check it for square. We found it to be out of square to itself by .016. After completing this job they began using this mill as a qualified machine and made their masters from this machine.

They then brought us in to qualify all of their mills and benchmark them. We now have all of these machines on a routine schedule for requalification on a yearly basis.



PLASTICS
Laser Borescope Aligned Severely Misaligned Extruder in 6 hours.
Laser Borescope Aligned Severely Misaligned Extruder in 6 hours.

Laser Borescope Aligned Severely Misaligned Extruder in 6 hours

by Guy Laverty, HLI Alignment Technician

Company: Bemis Corporation, Terre Haute, IN (8" extruder)

An extruder operator at Bemis installed an extruder screw in a barrel but failed to install the drive key in the screw. The gearbox drives the screw via drive key. Through operation and friction, the screw had welded itself to the inside bore of the gearbox.

When the operator shut the extruder down for a screw change (different material/different screw), he encountered difficulty in removing the screw. Repairmen hooked up a 50 ton hydraulic jack to pull out the screw. After trying this with no success, they hooked up a 100 ton jack. After maximum pressure, the screw broke loose.

When the operator tried to install the new screw, it would not seat into the gearbox. Repairmen rechecked and recleaned all mating parts. The operator tried to install the screw again with no success. The repairmen suspected some type of misalignment. Bemis called Hamar Laser to check the extruder.

I set up the laser system on the 8" extruder. The end of the barrel readings were -.040 vertical and -.179 horizontal. The horizontal readings were very unusual. I started making horizontal moves. By using horizontal jackscrews only about .040 of movement was possible. I took more readings and checks. I concluded that when the repairmen removed the screw with the 100 ton jack, they had sprung the barrel support between the barrel and gearbox.

With the barrel support being sprung out of specification, there are only two means of bringing the barrel back to horizontal center. One is removing the support and having it remachined in the machine shop, which would take a few days in this case. The second choice is to place shims between the barrel and support to bring the barrel back to center.

I chose to install shims between the barrel and support due to the fact that the company urgently wanted to resume production. After my final adjustments, the live readings were -.012 vertical and .004 horizontal. Perfect readings would be -.010 to -.012 vertical and .000 horizontal.

This was an unconventional barrel alignment. The time expended was approximately 6 hours. Numbers were acquired in 20 minutes. The screw slipped in by hand (!) and the extruder was running great.


Laser Borescope Aligned 7 Extruders in 14 Hours!
Laser Borescope Aligned 7 Extruders in 14 Hours!

Laser Borescope Faster Than Older Technologies

Lasers and Extruders by Mark A. Keyser, Hamar Laser

Lasers can generate the straight lines needed to make extruders operate efficiently. The principles behind laser alignment date back more than 25 years when it was found that a laser could duplicate both the properties of tight-wires or optical borescopes. In simplest terms, the setup of the laser is very similar to that of both the borescope and the tight-wire in that a near point and far point are used to determine a straight line which will be used as a reference line on which the alignment of the barrel and gearbox will be based. The laser projecting a beam of light down the length of the barrel is set in the hollow quill of the gearbox and a target, placed in the downstream end of the barrel, is used to "buck-in" or to "indicate" the laser in to the axis of rotation of the gearbox. Small micrometers on the rear of the laser allow the light source to be "qualified" to the axis of rotation of the gearbox through a simple operation known as the Normin (for normal & inverted readings) procedure. A reading is taken with the laser in what can be termed the "12:00" position of the quill. The entire quill (laser and all) is then rotated 180 degrees and the laser is read again and 1/2 of the error is removed using the micrometers on the rear of the laser. During the operation the self-centering target, which is connected to an X-Y readout reading in thousandths of an inch, looks back at the laser. The Normin procedure assures the operator that the laser spot is rotating on itself as opposed to projecting a cone shaped light. From here, it is simply a matter of pushing the target up the bore towards the laser and recording the X-Y readings as stops are made along the length of the barrel. (In the case of twinscrew extruders where a hollow quill is not available in which to place a laser, a rear mount/front adjust laser is placed on the splined shaft that drives the screw.) Corrections to the alignment are then made with the laser/target/readout combination acting as a realtime display showing not only the direction of the misalignment but also the magnitude.

The time needed to set up and take readings on a single screw extruder should be no more than 15 to 20 minutes. (The time needed on a twin would be a bit longer.) The laser system will generally cut the total time required for the job by nearly 1/2 to 2/3 of older technology.

The cost of a system is generally comparable to the cost of optical borescopes. Given the accuracy of the laser, and the greatly reduced machinery downtime requirements of the procedure, when coupled with the fact that the laser is extremely simple to use (especially for in-house maintenance crews with reduced manpower and budgets) the laser is now a cost-effective alternative to older, less precise technology.


Laser Borescope Faster Than Older Technologies
Laser Borescope Faster Than Older Technologies

Laser Borescope Faster Than Older Technologies

Lasers and Extruders by Mark A. Keyser, Hamar Laser

Lasers can generate the straight lines needed to make extruders operate efficiently. The principles behind laser alignment date back more than 25 years when it was found that a laser could duplicate both the properties of tight-wires or optical borescopes. In simplest terms, the setup of the laser is very similar to that of both the borescope and the tight-wire in that a near point and far point are used to determine a straight line which will be used as a reference line on which the alignment of the barrel and gearbox will be based. The laser projecting a beam of light down the length of the barrel is set in the hollow quill of the gearbox and a target, placed in the downstream end of the barrel, is used to "buck-in" or to "indicate" the laser in to the axis of rotation of the gearbox. Small micrometers on the rear of the laser allow the light source to be "qualified" to the axis of rotation of the gearbox through a simple operation known as the Normin (for normal & inverted readings) procedure. A reading is taken with the laser in what can be termed the "12:00" position of the quill. The entire quill (laser and all) is then rotated 180 degrees and the laser is read again and 1/2 of the error is removed using the micrometers on the rear of the laser. During the operation the self-centering target, which is connected to an X-Y readout reading in thousandths of an inch, looks back at the laser. The Normin procedure assures the operator that the laser spot is rotating on itself as opposed to projecting a cone shaped light. From here, it is simply a matter of pushing the target up the bore towards the laser and recording the X-Y readings as stops are made along the length of the barrel. (In the case of twinscrew extruders where a hollow quill is not available in which to place a laser, a rear mount/front adjust laser is placed on the splined shaft that drives the screw.) Corrections to the alignment are then made with the laser/target/readout combination acting as a realtime display showing not only the direction of the misalignment but also the magnitude.

The time needed to set up and take readings on a single screw extruder should be no more than 15 to 20 minutes. (The time needed on a twin would be a bit longer.) The laser system will generally cut the total time required for the job by nearly 1/2 to 2/3 of older technology.

The cost of a system is generally comparable to the cost of optical borescopes. Given the accuracy of the laser, and the greatly reduced machinery downtime requirements of the procedure, when coupled with the fact that the laser is extremely simple to use (especially for in-house maintenance crews with reduced manpower and budgets) the laser is now a cost-effective alternative to older, less precise technology.

 

POWER
Power Company in Georgia Increase Turbine Efficiency with L-705

Power Company in Georgia Increase Turbine Efficiency with L-705

Power Company in Georgia Increase Turbine Efficiency with L-705

A power company in Georgia was one of our first customers in turbine laser alignment. They originally bought an L-711 in 1979 and since then have upgraded their system many times and use our lasers for all of their outages. They tell us that on the very first alignment they did with our lasers, they were able to increase the efficiency of their turbines significantly. They way they put it is that before laser alignment, the turbine rotor took 10 minutes to stop rotating after shut down but after laser alignment it too 34 minutes! They are confident that the system paid for itself in the first month of operation. This does not even count the time they saved on their outages by using lasers versus tight wire.

Power Company in Tennessee Reduces Turbine Alignment Times by 50% Using L-705
Power Company in Tennessee Reduces Turbine Alignment Times by 50% Using L-705

Power Company in Tennessee Reduces Turbine Alignment Times by 50% Using L-705

A power company that serves the Southeast purchased our L-705 in 1996 and implemented it soon thereafter. They use it to align the inner components of their turbines as well as checking the settings of their oil bores. On the very first outage, they found that the laser took half as long as the tight wire to align the turbine. And the results were slightly more repeatable, as well. They really liked the fact that other work can be done on the turbine when taking measurements with the laser, which is very difficult to do with tight wire. They also liked the fact that the measurements did not depend upon the interpretation of an operator, like when using tight wire and an inside micrometer.

 

ROLL ALIGNMENT
Lasers Help Reduce Mark IV Press Warm Up Periods

Lasers Help Reduce Mark IV Press Warm Up Periods

Lasers Help Reduce Mark IV Press Warm Up Periods
Eddy on Assignment

Source: LGM Graphics, Inc. Company Newsletter

"The most efficient use of paper has become increasingly imperative as paper prices rise and sensitivity to environmental issues grow. As LGM's environmental watchdog, the control and management of our paper stock is of considerable interest to me."
Enviro Eddy, Environmental Watchdog, LGM Graphics Inc.

The sound is a piercing 90 decibels of mechanized activity < the sound of the Mark IV Press. Another magazine is rolling off the press and in the time it take to turn my head, the signatures are cut, folded, and packed on skids ready for the bindery process. The sounds all but drown our Bill¹s voice as he describes the action that is taking place all around us.

I¹m Enviro Eddy. I¹m in the press room at LGM Graphics and about to learn from Bill Goralchuk, Web and Engineering Manager, the steps that have been and are being taken to gain control over paper consumed in the printing process. The most efficient use of paper has become increasingly imperative as paper prices rise and sensitivity to environmental issues grow. As LGM¹s environmental watchdog, the control and management of our paper stock is of considerable interest to me.

Numerous factors come into play as we study the problem of paper waste. At the start of each job, the press is "webbed" up and the make is ready begun. As the paper is pulled through the press, the crew adjusts the color, water register, folding and many other areas and control the printing process. So until the product is ready to save on skids, what is being produced? You guessed it; the less waster there is in paper, ink and labor.

Since the purchase of the Mark IV in 1988, our make ready and run waste has been significantly reduced. And how did we do this? I thought you would never ask.

Color setting time has been reduced through the use of the state of the art scanning and computer based press adjustments. Register is automatically adjusted by stroke cameras that use targets on the web to manipulate the paper and cylinders. The job is then completed by a computer controlled folder.

Water composition plays a role in printing jobs. The characteristics of a city¹s water supply can vary depending on the season and what the city puts into the water, to keep it safe for the population it serves. These fluctuations in water composition cause problems with color production, and again, when the colors change within a job, the job is unacceptable, that translates into paper waste. Although Winnipeg¹s water supply is far from being the worst for impurities, it was causing a degree of difficulty. To counteract this problem LGM installed a reverse osmosis filtration system, which cleans our water supply, eliminating all but 2% of the impurities. This has further reduced our make-ready waste, to the point where impurities in the water are no longer a problem.

The amount of paper that moves through modern presses is phenomenal area of 14 million pounds annually. Of course, with no method of control in place, waste would also be phenomenal.

Arriving at an efficient method of managing and controlling the amount of waste paper coming off the presses has been a long and arduous task for Bill Goralchuk. But, step by step, the battle of waste paper is being won. It actually began as far back as 1982 when an attempt was made to "try to identify waste from records." Bill, with consultant Jack Russel who had expertise in the area of waste management made an effort to develop an accurate press count system.

After testing several different systems LGM chose the Toledo Seale Company technology, combined this with input from Bill and the computer expertise of Mind Computers (Brad Fry and Neil Stern) and created a system customized to our particular requirements. This system, using QNX Windows based software developed in Ottawa, now provides us with much more information. It has eliminated under and over-production on jobs, and we know how much waste there is on a job < the current average is around 2%. The monitor indicates the quantity to be printed, the quantity that has already been printed, it indicates the percentage of waste produced at each moment of the press run. An added feature of the systems includes a preventative maintenance program. The monitor indicates at what point the press needs grease and oil.

By the time this article is published, LGM¹s new Hantscho Mark 16 Press will be operational. With the introduction of our new 4 million dollar press we will be moving to the 50 inch wide rolls of paper. This will further reduce waste paper by cutting down on the number of splices and will reduce the amount of space required for storage of inventory by 30-40%. To solve the problem of mis-alignment a new technique, "laser alignment" [HLI's L-723 Triplescan] is being used for the first time with the equipment . This will refine printing accuracy to within 1/1000th of an inch as opposed to the present 5 to 10/1000th of an inch. Plans are to apply this new laser alignment technique to the Mark IV early in the new year.

Bill is looking ahead to the time when press warm-up periods will be eliminated. [Ed. note: Misalignment causes lots of wasted paper during warmup periods]. This will further reduce waste paper that occurs as the press warms up to ideal printing temperature. To this end Bill envisions the use of a type of block heater similar to that in your car. Bill compared the development in press heaters as the "greatest invention in the industry since offset printing." Future editions of PressPective will carry developments as they occur.

Control and management of paper used at LGM Graphics is Bill¹s responsibility. "Paper is the most expensive part of any printing operation, reducing paper used in the production process allows us to remain competitive," he concluded over the steady sound of the busy Mark IV.

Mark IV Press Runs at Full Speed with No Adjustments upon Initial Run
Mark IV Press Runs at Full Speed with No Adjustments upon Initial Run

Mark IV Press Runs at Full Speed with no Adjustments upon Initial Run
LGM Graphics by Randy Bruce, HLI Technician

On a recent application using the L-723 Tri Scan Laser and the L-740 coupling Laser we had great success installing a printing press.

The press being installed was a Hantscho Mark 16, 4 color printing press. Using the scan planes of the L-723 we made each unit from the roll stands to the folder square within .00" to each other from end to end. We also insured each unit was on center line within .010" from end to end (100').

Since it was a CNC press, it can, if needed, adjust the roll automatically to be in line with the centerline of the plates. Upon start up, the press didn't adjust any rolls, so the press was run up to half capacity (20,000 cycles per hour). After start up the press was checked for any adjustments that might be needed and none were found. The press was then increased to full capacity (40,000 cph) with no ill effects found. The installer I was working with said he had never seen a press start up as easily and on line as this one did in his 30 years in the business.

Using the L-740 coupling Laser reduced the drive shaft alignment from 3 days to 5 hours and the whole alignment took approximately 5 days, with a much higher accuracy then optics or wire alignment could ever achieve.

The installers comment (John Crumm Litho Repair Service) after seeing this system work was that "If your press has not been laser aligned your press has not been aligned!"


L-723 Solves Wrinkling Problem on Mark IV Printing Press
L-723 Solves Wrinkling Problem on Mark IV Printing Press

L-723 Solves Wrinkling Problem on Mark IV Printing Press
by Randy Bruce, HLI Technician

In January of 1994, I was hired to check and align a Hantscho Mark IV printing press at LGM Graphics in Winnipeg, CA with John Crumm, Litho Repair Service.

We started measuring the press on Saturday morning. The measurement was from end to end of the machine which included, the Infeed unit, eight segments, chills, web guide, and the folder. A total of .062 out of squareness was found and the units were out of centerline to one another by .070. We squared each unit on Sunday and Monday and moved the dual Roll Stand about eight feet closer to the Infeed unit on Tuesday, keeping it square and on centerline to the rest of the machine. The company had been complaining of paper wrinkle as well as continuously adjusting the rolls to the center. The only problem we encountered was the segments were bolt bound when we tried to move the segments into centerline. Initially the machine had been aligned using wire alignment, which doesn't tell you if the rolls are square to one another. With the oven in place even this method of alignment would not be able to be used.

We found the folder to out of square by .052, which was more than likely causing the wrinkling problem. After talking to LGM on Friday April 15th the production manager told me that the press is running much better than it did before and that the wrinkling problem has gone away. They are still plagued by caulking, but he understands this because we were bolt bound and did not have enough time to fix that problem.


Laser Alignment for the Caster Machine Repair Aisle [PDF, 338K]

 

ROTATING EQUIPMENT
Coupling Lasers Reduce Mark IV Press Drive-Shaft Alignment to 5 Hours

Coupling Lasers Reduce Mark IV Press Drive-Shaft Alignment to 5 Hours

Coupling Lasers Reduce Mark IV Press Drive-Shaft Alignment to 5 Hours
Mark 16 Up and Running

Source: LGM Graphics, Inc. Company Newsletter

One look at the array of periodicals in a library or at a newsstand quickly indicates the importance of magazines and catalogues in the exchange of ideas and information. One can be swept away in the tide of titles.

By utilizing advances in modern printing methods, such as are available at LGM Graphics, publishers of Consumer and Trade magazines, catalogues, brochures and calendars are now producing full color printed products at a phenomenal speed.

With LGM's newly installed Hantscho Mark 16 Press in full production, our customers continue to benefit from complex printing technology. "Our niche in the marketplace is small to medium run magazines and catalogues," stated Ken Hamilton, Production Manager, and he continued, "we have now enhanced our capabilities within that niche to provide faster turnaround of printed products to our customers, and all around improved service."

The Hantscho Mark 16 was manufactured by Rockwell International, in Redding, Pennsylvania and because of the success with the two Hantscho¹s presently in use < the decision was made to continue with the same manufacturer. Turning out 30,000 to 40,000 printed and folded signatures per hour, this particular press "fits our run lengthSfits our niche," said Mr. Hamilton.

Lasers Reduced Drive Shaft Alignment From 3 Days to 5 Hours

In the installation of the Mark 16, LGM acted on the recommendation of the manufacturer in employing the Hamar Laser Alignment [S-640 Coupling Alignment System] to align the drive-shaft, viewed as the most critical phase. The resulting accuracy in alignment is within one thousandth of an inch at any point on the press. This computer-assisted technology reduced alignment time from the standard 3 days to 5 hours. The work was carried out by technical staff from Hamar Laser in Connecticut and John Crum, of John Crum Litho Repair Service, based in New Jersey, working with LGM¹s own maintenance crew, headed by Bill Goralchuk, Web and Engineering Manager.

Hamar¹s technician believes installation of LGM's Mark 16 to be the first time the S-640 system has been used to align a brand new press in North America. "It would be safe to say in Canada, for sure," stated Mr. Goralchuk.


OTHER
L-723 Does On-Site QC Checks of Large Parts Before Shipment
L-723 Does On-Site QC Checks of Large Parts Before Shipment

L-723 Does on-Site QC Checks of Large Parts Before Shipment
Motch Corporation Cleveland, Ohio
by Guy Laverty
HLI Technician

Inspection of 2 large machine slides approximately 2' X 5' X 8', weight 10,000 lbs.

The customer Motch Corporation had an outside vendor machine, two large cross-slides for a large precision grinder.

The problem was that Motch wanted the cross-slides inspected at the vendors plant before shipment. The slides were checked for thickness, width and length with conventional measuring tools, but Motch also wanted to verify flatness, squareness and parallelism of the slides. Typically this type of a check would be performed on a computerized measuring machine, but size and the location of the parts prevented this.

Motch called Hamar Laser to come to the vendors plant to check the geometry of the slides.

I came to the vendors plant with a 723-laser and set-up. I found minimum errors on all checks. I recorded all data on paper then entered the data [220 points] into the Hamar Plane 4 Software Program. After entering the data and printing out the graphs I gave the information to the engineer in charge and he reviewed the data and graphs. After the review he gave the plant manager permission to ship the parts.

Time: 5 hours for both parts including setup, data entry and report generation.

Just an example that large parts/machines can be inspected with a laser where other means are not possible.


Universal Instruments Saves $1.5 Million in Production Costs
Universal Instruments Saves $1.5 Million in Production Costs

Universal Saves $1.5 Million Using L-723

Source: Letter from Universal Instruments Corporation, March 28, 2000

This is an update on the use of the triple scan laser system that we purchased from you. We¹ve ended up using it more for process/product research and qualification than for machine tool metrology, although we do use it both.

We did a Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA) of the system in relation to our frame, similar to the testing we did before we bought it. The analysis confirmed that the system was capable of detecting the required process and product variation (accuracy and repeatability over the required volume), keeping in mind appropriate metrology practices to control potential sources of variation such as setup, thermal error, etc.

Once the measurement system capability was established, we tested over thirty frames under different processing regimes to quantify the output of the machining processes. The intent was to see if we could eliminate an extra 4-hour machining operation. The machining test data were independently correlated with assembly test data for those frames. The end result was that we were able to eliminate the extra operation.

Benefits: Savings: elimination of the extra machining operation resulted in 1,768 hours saved in the last five months (4,243 annualized hours) < a substantial time/dollar savings.

Additional capacity: these 1,768 hours (4,243 annualized) have also been gained as additional capacity for producing more product with the same resources. [Ed note: Universal was able to cancel a $1.2 million order for a new machine by freeing up this capacity.]

Data: We were able to cost-effectively obtain data from machining and assembly operations, which we previously couldn't do. Either we didn¹t have the equipment of equivalent or better capability, or such equipment could cost 2 to more than 10 times the system that we purchased. The data obtained with the laser system < combined with simultaneous data from other instrumentation < enabled us to confirm or disprove hypotheses about manufacturing and assembly processes, and about inherent product characteristics.

The above is only one application so far. We do use the laser for machine tool characterization, and find that it can be a time-saver. It¹s also being used to quantify process output (product characteristics) for machining and assembly operations.

We appreciate the time you¹ve spent and the service you¹ve provided in helping us with this equipment.

Paul Hudec Process Engineering Analyst Universal Instruments Corporation


Strander Alignment Helps Sanderson Crew
Strander Alignment Helps Sanderson Crew

Strander Alignment Helps Sanderson Crew.

Good morning Darel,
Hope you are doing well. I just wanted to drop you a line and let you know that we really appreciate your alignment work on the strander. The machine has been running well. We replaced some bad parts on the No. 5 stand which greatly improved the smoothness too. Time will tell, but hopefully we helped the situation.


Best regards from myself and the Sanderson crew.

Rail Gun

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